• China’s emissions glimpsing the peak


    China recently announced its intention to peak its carbon-dioxide emissions. How soon could the emissions peak and at what absolute value? Libo Wu explores.
  • The greening of the Southern Hemisphere


    The 2010-2011 La Niña weather event brought lush vegetation to vast semi-arid regions in the Southern Hemisphere and altered the delicate balance of the global carbon sinks. Owen Gaffney explores how La Niña might change in the future and what that might imply.

Features


March 2, 2015
Throughout history human societies have had to confront and adjust to climatic and environmental hazards. A long-term perspective that draws on such experiences must inform today’s climate policies, argue Jago Cooper and Christian Isendahl .
March 2, 2015
China recently announced its intention to peak its carbon-dioxide emissions. How soon could the emissions peak and at what absolute value? Libo Wu explores.
March 2, 2015
The 2010-2011 La Niña weather event brought lush vegetation to vast semi-arid regions in the Southern Hemisphere and altered the delicate balance of the global carbon sinks. Owen Gaffney explores how La Niña might change in the future and what that might imply.
March 2, 2015
In South Asia, crop-residue burning is a regionally significant source of black carbon or soot – a pollutant that affects human health and climate. Aisling Irwin reports on recent work in the region that explains why farmers choose to burn their fields and which incentives might encourage them not to.
May 13, 2014
Momentum is building towards the development of universally applicable sustainable development goals. Owen Gaffney reports on the progress so far and explores the path ahead.
May 8, 2014
Understanding the interface between the land and the atmosphere has been an important component of IGBP’s research. Here we highlight three recent contributions that resulted from research sponsored by the Integrated Land Ecosystem–Atmosphere Processes Study (iLEAPS).
May 8, 2014
Every year, more and more people are flocking to live near the sea’s edge, often congregating in massive cities. Sophie Blackburn and Mark Pelling explore what happens when urban and coastal zones collide.
May 6, 2014
Many of the world’s deltas are sinking much faster than sea level is rising globally. No two deltas are alike: the causes and consequences of sinking thus vary widely, James Syvitski tells Sebastian Moffett .
January 14, 2014
Research increasingly crosses disciplinary boundaries and draws in outside stakeholders. Karl-Heinz Erb , Veronika Gaube and Marina Fischer-Kowalski report from two decades of experience in inter- and transdisciplinary research at the Institute of Social Ecology in Vienna, Austria. They advise on how to succeed in three not-so-easy steps.
December 11, 2013
Even before the advent of agriculture, Homo sapiens kicked off an entirely new process of planetary change. Earth would never be the same. Instead of mere centuries, Erle C Ellis advances a broader view of the Anthropocene, over many millennia, and what that means for land stewardship.
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  • Global Change Magazine No. 83


    This issue features a special section on carbon. You can read about peak greenhouse-gas emissions in China, the mitigation of black carbon emissions and the effect of the 2010-2011 La Niña event on gl...

  • Global Change Magazine No. 82


    This issue features a full-spread infographic on deltas at risk, accompanied by a Q&A with IGBP Chair James Syvitski. You can also read about coastal megacities, the progress in crystallising the Sust...
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