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Published: November 19, 2013

Climate change: the state of the science

A new data visualization released on the first day of the plenary negotiations at the UNFCCC’s climate negotiations (COP-19) in Warsaw articulates climate risks and the challenge of remaining below 2 degrees.

Produced by the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme and Globaia, and funded by the UN Foundation, the 3-minute film uses stunning visuals to unravel exactly what the IPCC’s climate probability ranges mean for societies. It concludes that if the world wants a “likely” chance (66-100%) of remaining within the 2 degree Celsius target set by international policymakers, then we can only emit around 250 billion tonnes of carbon to the atmosphere. Given emissions are currently around 10 billion tonnes a year and rising, this give societies about 25 years.


Large emissions cuts will increase the chances of remaining below two degrees, and extend the time before breaching this budget.

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