• Using the Planet


    Even before the advent of agriculture, Homo sapiens kicked off an entirely new process of planetary change. Earth would never be the same. Instead of mere centuries, Erle C Ellis advances a broader view of the Anthropocene, over many millennia, and what that means for land stewardship.
  • Lessons from a simulated civilisation


    The rise and fall of the ancient Maya has
    intrigued historians and archaeologists for decades. Now, Earth-system scientists are taking a keen interest. Scott Heckbert asks: what role might environmental conditions and trade play in the growth and eventual collapse of a civilisation?

"Welcome to the Anthropocene" film and still images

A visually spectacular animated film, Welcome to the Anthropocene, has been released on the eve of the major international science conference Planet Under Pressure.
Welcome to the Anthropocene is a 3-minute rollercoaster ride through the latest chapter in the story of how one species has transformed a planet.

“The Anthropocene changes our relationship with the planet. We have a new responsibility and we need to determine how to meet that responsibility.” Conference Chief Scientific Advisor, Nobel Laureate Professor Elinor Ostrom, Indiana University.

Welcome to the Anthropocene, commissioned by the London Planet Under Pressure conference*, provides a data visualization of the state of the planet. It opens at the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. As the camera swoops over Earth, viewers watch the planetary impact of humanity: cities, roads, railways, pipelines, cables and shipping lanes until finally the world’s planes spin a fine web around the planet. The film is produced as part of the world’s first educational portal on the Anthropocene.

NOTE ON GRAPH OVERLAY:

In the 3-minute film, the graph's y-axis title rotates like an airline departure board providing latest information on key parameters: population, energy use, GDP, urbanization, fertilizer use, deforestation, biodiversity loss, and others. The graph overlay is an artist's interpretation of the great acceleration in human activity.

Copyright: Globaia, Planet Under Pressure, SEI, SRC, CSIRO

Below are still images from the short film "Welcome to the Anthropocene".
Download a hirez version of this image (1920 pixels x 1080 pixels) here
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Download a hirez version of this image (1920 pixels x 1080 pixels) here
Download a hirez version of this image (1920 pixels x 1080 pixels) here
Download a hirez version of this image (1920 pixels x 1080 pixels) here
Download a hirez version of this image (1920 pixels x 1080 pixels) here
Download a hirez version of this image (1920 pixels x 1080 pixels) here
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